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Author Topic: Bodywork  (Read 4485 times)
JL
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« on: May 17, 2009, 10:35:16 pm »

Now that the suspension and brakes are back together and I have freed off the clutch, I am back onto the bodywork.
Has anyone stripped their paintwork back? I am trying to decide if the pink layer on the photograph is a primer layer - anyone know?

Regards
John
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Jon Weywadt
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« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2009, 08:24:57 am »

Now that the suspension and brakes are back together and I have freed off the clutch, I am back onto the bodywork.
Has anyone stripped their paintwork back? I am trying to decide if the pink layer on the photograph is a primer layer - anyone know?

Regards
John
Hi John.
It is hard to tell from such a small picture. The original fiberglass should be white from what I have seen so far. It could be repairs. But no matter what, make sure you use an epoxy sealer as the first coat. Otherwise you risk getting moisture bubbles in the paint. The fiberglass is not entirely water proof and moisture can penetrate from the back. But you probably already knew that, since you are stripping all the paint.  Grin
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Matranaut par excellence Cool
JL
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Posts: 234



« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2009, 10:03:39 am »

Yes, the car was covered in micro blisters! I am considering coating the underside to reduce or stop any water penetrarion but as yet I am trying to decide what with.

I am not sure how I managed to get the photograph so pathetically small so here are a couple of larger shot, you can see remains of the blisters.

Once the rubbing down is complete I am going to spray the body with a barrier coat and then a 2 pack primer with all rubbing down done dry. After that I am going to use a normal 2 pack paint system, but if anyone has any better ideas ~I am willing to listen.

Regards
John
« Last Edit: May 18, 2009, 10:07:44 am by JL » Logged
krede
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« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2009, 11:48:32 am »

What facilities do you have at your disposal for the paint process ??  I've read that 2-pac should only be used by professionals due to the cyanide fumes, and that only cellulose and acrylics are really suited for DIY jobs? 
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Oskar
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« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2009, 12:54:25 pm »

dont know if this helps http://www.askthebuilder.com/B264_Painting_Fiberglass_Doors_Finishing_Tips.shtml

can it be done by using topcoat first?
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peugeot 205 gti
murena 1.6
JL
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Posts: 234



« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2009, 02:51:33 pm »

Hi Oskar thanks for the information, because of the past moisture in the fibreglass problems I am doing all preparation dry and the website says wash with detergent and then allow to dry - you cannot win!

Krede you are quite correct about the dangers of 2 pack paints, I am sorting out an air fed mask. Out of interest here is some information from our Health and Safety Executive on 2 pack paints. Happy reading!

Regards
John
working with 2-pack isocyanate paints, safety in motor vehicle repair
Introduction: 2-pack paints, in which isocyanate hardener
or activator is added to a pigmented or clear base component, are used
extensively in motor vehicle repair (MVR) for repainting/refinishing vehicles.
This guidance is aimed at employers, self-employed people, supervisors and employees involved in spray, brush or roller painting of motor vehicle body panels. It explains how exposure to isocyanates in 2-pack paints could affect
workers’ health, and outlines some of the precautions that can be taken to protect against the main risks.
What are the dangers?
Exposure to isocyanates can cause long-term and lifethreatening illness. There is a risk if unreacted isocyanate is breathed in, or splashed onto the skin or into the eyes.
Vapours, spray mists, and dusts containing isocyanates are highly irritant to the respiratory tract and eyes, and may cause or worsen existing asthma, or dermatitis.
Working with 2-pack paints can lead to (allergic) sensitisation to isocyanates. Once someone is sensitised, further exposure to even very small amounts of isocyanates can start an asthma attack. Attacks can take place immediately or be delayed for up to 12 hours after exposure, so the symptoms may occur away from work. Early signs of sensitisation may be runny/itchy eyes or nose, developing later into a wheeze,
chest tightness, breathlessness or coughing. Isocyanates are present in the hardener in two forms, monomer and prepolymer, as well as in mixed paint, before
curing.
‘Risk Phrases’ on the paint supplier’s Safety data sheet will identify any health hazards, eg:
● Asthma - by breathing in isocyanate vapour or mist
R42: may cause sensitisation by inhalation
● Dermatitis - from skin contact with the paint or
component chemicals
R43: may cause sensitisation by skin contact
● Conjunctivitis - from splashes to the eye
R36: irritating to eyes
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JL
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Posts: 234



« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2009, 03:28:29 pm »

Jon, one thing has occured to me and that is that the Murena is made with epoxy resin glassfibe which presumably should be water resistant. Also found this link to a book preview which is interesting.
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=2QU9zRN-2igC&pg=PA42&lpg=PA42&dq=epoxy+primers&source=bl&ots=UHzvKNuyFd&sig=TrQk7Ltcu9sPLKMpj0gozlm2-nQ&hl=en&ei=xlsRStGJJePLjAe--eWEDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3#PPA44,M1

Regards
John
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krede
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« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2009, 03:31:53 pm »

Indeed.... It's just not worth the risk without proper safety precautions!..

I have found some marine paint that supposedly can be "roll and tipped" to give a good finish... comparable to a diy spray job... I'll try it out on some of the spare fiberglass parts I have... If it disappoints, I will probably try out some acrylics as these seem to be, by far, the easiest to manage for the beginner.... and besides.. my car will not be seeing that much service... so the extra durability isn't worth the risk and cost of using 2-pac
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krede
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« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2009, 03:32:49 pm »

He he.. I bought that book some years ago...  Smiley
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JL
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Posts: 234



« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2009, 06:37:07 pm »

Not really on thread but I got so fed up with bodywork over the weekend that I decided to remove some of the electrical wiring added by previous owners. While lying on my back removing wires under the dashboard I discovered the source of my strange buzzing noise whenever I switched on the ignition. I have now removed it(see picture)

I have also managed to get the passenger side electric window working - it seemed to have just seized. Now well greased it works, a bit sluggish but it works. Any ideas for lubricating the side channels - maybe silicone or similar?

Regards
John
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suffolkpete
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« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2009, 09:44:33 pm »

You can see some strange electrical work on old cars.  When I bought mine, there were two switches added for the two driving lights.  When I turned the headlights on, one driving light was on and the other was off and when I dipped them they swapped over.
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