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Author Topic: Headlamp operation and vacuum system  (Read 4784 times)
TimS
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« on: September 27, 2012, 09:29:07 pm »

Maybe someone could help me with this.  I want to know how the headlamp raising/lowering works with the vacuum system. As my car has not run for ten years I have not seen it work.

I have connected a new battery so all the electrics work. If I turn the headlamps on, should they rise up if the engine has not been run for a long time?

At the moment the headlamps come on, but do not rise. So it shines pointing down. If I pull them up by hand, it does stay up and will not come down if I turn the lights off. So what is keeping it up?

Normally does the vacuum reservoir operate the lifting if the engine has not run for a while?

Also all my lights seem to work without even a key in the ignition, headlamps, side lamps and indicators. Is this normal?
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klumzer
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« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2012, 10:31:31 pm »

The system is operated by vacuum created by the engine while running. If you cannot start the engine the lifting mechanism does not work.

If you do not have leakage in the vacuum system you can operate the headlamps twice or thrice after stopping the engine, the bottle can provide it. But not after a long time, because every system has a small leakage.

If your vacuum system does not work, you can open the lamps manually by a wire. The lamps are also supported by a spring that is why they are kept up. You can find this spring at the left side of the link system behind the front bumper where the vacuum actuator connects.

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Jon Weywadt
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« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2012, 09:17:59 am »

Maybe someone could help me with this.  I want to know how the headlamp raising/lowering works with the vacuum system. As my car has not run for ten years I have not seen it work.
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On a car as old as the Murena it is quite normal that the lights can be turned on without the ignition key being turned.
As Klumzer wrote, the lights can be raised manually. There should be a wire under the dashboard towards the left side (if it has not broken off) Pulling it will raise the lights. However, it requires the assisting spring(s) on the lift bar to be in place. Otherwise they are too heavy to lift manually. The spring can be easily seen below the lamps. On mine there was only a spring on the left side. But there is also mounting points on the right for an additional spring.
You should start by checking that the vacuum selenoid switch in the front compartment operates when you turn on the lights.
If it does, check the entire vacuum system from the vacuum bottle on the righthand back side of the engine compartment and forward. Mine was ok, but the hose dried and cracked, thus no vacuum. All the vacuum hoses in the engine compartment had to be replaced.
With the engine running, check if there is vacuum to the solenoid switch. If so and the switch works it could be the vacuum motor has a cracked diaphragm. But the most likely cause is cracked vacuum hoses somewhere.
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TimS
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« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2012, 03:11:06 pm »

Thanks. I need to change the hoses then as they are quite old. Now I know how it should work I'll finish the engine first.
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suffolkpete
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« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2012, 05:06:28 pm »

It's probably worth pointing out that the vacuum servo is double acting, in other words vacuum power is used to lower the lights as well as raise them.  You should hear an audible click when you switch on the lights if the solenoid, located on the left-hand inner front wing, is working.
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Oetker
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« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2012, 07:35:39 pm »

And not to forget, it is used to put the power on the brake-servo.
The system has to be in good order.
30 minutes after stopping the engine still raising the lamps means that system is not bad.
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I feel like Jonah, only my fish looks different.
Murena 2.2 Red 1982. Murena 1.6 black on places.
TimS
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« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2012, 01:58:24 pm »

Thanks. The solenoid seems to work and pressurises. It keeps the lamps up and has some force to hold them down. There is not much charge yet as the engine has only been run for a few minutes at a time while I check for leaks and bleed

This is the solenoid....http://db.tt/1EtVlOw4

Should it be uncovered like this or should the metal piece be turned through 90 degrees to cover it?
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klumzer
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« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2012, 02:59:40 pm »

I think the housing of the electromagnet should be fully closed, one side is missing on yours.
The position of the aluminium plate is not important I think. When I overhauled mine I had to use shims at the connection to adjust the correct operation of the valve.
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Oetker
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« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2012, 03:38:14 pm »

Standard it looks like this.


You can take it apart and clean it with silicon oil.





The newer Murena's have a cover.


Greetings Herman
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I feel like Jonah, only my fish looks different.
Murena 2.2 Red 1982. Murena 1.6 black on places.
suffolkpete
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« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2012, 06:37:46 pm »

The aluminium plate limits the travel of the plunger when the solenoid is released, but is not critical.  If you dismantle the valve, don't oil or grease it, just use a little talcum powder on the rubbers.
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klumzer
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« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2012, 10:21:57 pm »

This is the solenoid....http://db.tt/1EtVlOw4

If I can see well, the solenoid is broken at the upper mounting point. Mine was also broken so I made a mounting plate. As the housing was cracked at the screws I drilled the holes through and changed them to bolts. Others did the same to prevent more cracks.
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TimS
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« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2012, 11:20:04 pm »

Yes it is cracked at the top. I see what you have done. That should hold it in place. Thanks.
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Oetker
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« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2012, 09:23:00 am »

Quote
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The aluminium plate limits the travel of the plunger when the solenoid is released, but is not critical.
=======================================================================

It is critical.
It caused a leak in my 2.2 because it was leaning slightly at plunger.
Took a lot of time to find that leak.
Thats why I bended the plate slightly so it could run free.
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I feel like Jonah, only my fish looks different.
Murena 2.2 Red 1982. Murena 1.6 black on places.
Jon Weywadt
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« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2012, 10:05:04 am »

The aluminium plate limits the travel of the plunger when the solenoid is released, but is not critical.  If you dismantle the valve, don't oil or grease it, just use a little talcum powder on the rubbers.

The aluminum plate is indeed critical. On mine you could pull out the blunger with the plate removed.
I actually replaced it with a heavier gauge aluminum plate.

Like Klumzer, I replaced the self tapping screws holding the housing together. I drilled 3 mm holes all the way through and put some long stainless screws through. The self tapping screws crack the housing and then do not hold the housing together well enough to seal tight.
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Matranaut par excellence Cool
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