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Author Topic: Getting ready for the road again  (Read 122972 times)
TELBOY
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« Reply #180 on: May 04, 2020, 06:49:50 pm »

could you not wedge a socket or other tool behind the clutch actuating arm so as to fill the gap where the arm moves? then all of the hydraulic pressure when you operate the clutch pedal will move the cylinder. (not sure it I've explained that right) I know what I mean lol
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Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #181 on: May 04, 2020, 08:20:28 pm »

could you not wedge a socket or other tool behind the clutch actuating arm so as to fill the gap where the arm moves? then all of the hydraulic pressure when you operate the clutch pedal will move the cylinder. (not sure it I've explained that right) I know what I mean lol

Haha - I think I get your idea. It's worth trying Smiley

/Anders
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1982 Talbot Matra Murena 2.2 prep 142
2017 BMW i3 "Charged Professional" 94Ah

Used to own:
2001 Renault Matra Grand Espace "The Race" V6 24v
1997 Renault Matra Espace 2.0 8V
1987 Renault Matra Espace J11 2.2
Matraman
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« Reply #182 on: May 06, 2020, 08:58:34 am »

I sympathise with your clutch slave problem. Removing mine was one of the most difficult parts of the renovation so far, and I had the engine and gearbox out of the car! The inside of the slave cylinder had corroded so it had to come out. I ended up with the bell housing on the work bench with the clutch slave overhanging the edge. I removed the circlip and piston and put as large a socket as possible inside the cylinder then attached a short extension to that. I heated the outside of the support casting as hot as I dared then hit the end of the socket extension with a lump hammer. I was dreading breaking the casting but this was the only way I could get the slave cylinder to move. I tried everything else I could think of before arriving at this final solution, but no amount of penetrating fluid, clamps, twisting or gentle tapping would work. If I could have just done a refurbishment with new deals I would have done, but the inside (and outside) of the cylinder were too corroded.

Needless to say, the new slave has plenty of grease on the outside! Good luck with yours, it may not be as bad, mine had been in place for well over 20 years, unlike yours. Could you just renew the seals instead of removing the cylinder?
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Andrew
Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #183 on: May 06, 2020, 09:01:30 pm »

I sympathise with your clutch slave problem. Removing mine was one of the most difficult parts of the renovation so far, and I had the engine and gearbox out of the car! The inside of the slave cylinder had corroded so it had to come out. I ended up with the bell housing on the work bench with the clutch slave overhanging the edge. I removed the circlip and piston and put as large a socket as possible inside the cylinder then attached a short extension to that. I heated the outside of the support casting as hot as I dared then hit the end of the socket extension with a lump hammer. I was dreading breaking the casting but this was the only way I could get the slave cylinder to move. I tried everything else I could think of before arriving at this final solution, but no amount of penetrating fluid, clamps, twisting or gentle tapping would work. If I could have just done a refurbishment with new deals I would have done, but the inside (and outside) of the cylinder were too corroded.

Needless to say, the new slave has plenty of grease on the outside! Good luck with yours, it may not be as bad, mine had been in place for well over 20 years, unlike yours. Could you just renew the seals instead of removing the cylinder?

I think your sympathy helped - it's out! Ok, it may be the penetrating oil, light beating, twisting, and time. But you guys helped keep me hopful and creative!  

So I realized today I was actually able to the cylinder it a bit in the housing, and I was able to wiggle it out. I had already yesterday got it pushed around 1 mm inwards. The idea of wedgeing something in and trying to let it push itself out didn't work.

Actually the cylinder and the seals inside is perfect.

The only reason I wanted to remove it was that I stick to a principle of not draining the brake fluid. It's no big deal, actually, as Roy converted my car to silicone brake fluid before I bought it from him, and that's much easier to work with for a hobby mechanic, but so far I've managed to neither touch the brakes nor clutch cylinders during my restoration project Smiley

Things are getting serious now. The garage floor is broomed and there's now nothing else to remove on the engine, except the bolts through the three engine mounts, of course!

I' not sure why, but I'm pretty excited Smiley

I need three wooden rods so I can roll the engine out on a think board of plywood. I have the plywood board, but not the rods, so I need to go shopping tomorrow.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2020, 09:22:35 pm by Anders Dinsen » Logged

1982 Talbot Matra Murena 2.2 prep 142
2017 BMW i3 "Charged Professional" 94Ah

Used to own:
2001 Renault Matra Grand Espace "The Race" V6 24v
1997 Renault Matra Espace 2.0 8V
1987 Renault Matra Espace J11 2.2
TELBOY
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« Reply #184 on: May 06, 2020, 09:58:00 pm »

Fantastic. It is very satisfying when you get a step nearer your goal.
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Matraman
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« Reply #185 on: May 06, 2020, 09:59:02 pm »

Well done and good luck with the final engine removal !
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Andrew
Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #186 on: May 08, 2020, 02:53:48 pm »

Today is a holiday here, so I've spent some quality time with the Murena. It took a few hours work, a coffee break..., and the enigne came out! It looks good, doesn't it? Details will follow later, including a timelapse video of the process Smiley
« Last Edit: May 08, 2020, 03:00:51 pm by Anders Dinsen » Logged

1982 Talbot Matra Murena 2.2 prep 142
2017 BMW i3 "Charged Professional" 94Ah

Used to own:
2001 Renault Matra Grand Espace "The Race" V6 24v
1997 Renault Matra Espace 2.0 8V
1987 Renault Matra Espace J11 2.2
Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #187 on: May 08, 2020, 05:41:29 pm »

Here's the promised timelapse video. Ít's quickly made and there are a few cuts in the video so some details are left out, like getting the bolts out of the top and right hand engine mounts, but I hope it gives an idea of what the job involves. Just click the black picture below and you'll be taken to Flickr.

I'm using an engine dolly made by Jesper Kobbernagel. The engine sits at little higher than I planned on it, but thanks to the wheels then engine can be pushed to the side and doesn't have to be dragged under the console for the gear change. A wonderful moment was when the engine leaned to stand on the dolly. It's a simple but very efficient tool!


Matra Murena engine removal timelapse by Anders Dinsen, on Flickr
« Last Edit: May 08, 2020, 05:45:34 pm by Anders Dinsen » Logged

1982 Talbot Matra Murena 2.2 prep 142
2017 BMW i3 "Charged Professional" 94Ah

Used to own:
2001 Renault Matra Grand Espace "The Race" V6 24v
1997 Renault Matra Espace 2.0 8V
1987 Renault Matra Espace J11 2.2
Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #188 on: May 08, 2020, 05:46:18 pm »

Finally, here's a picture of a happy Matra owner Smiley
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1982 Talbot Matra Murena 2.2 prep 142
2017 BMW i3 "Charged Professional" 94Ah

Used to own:
2001 Renault Matra Grand Espace "The Race" V6 24v
1997 Renault Matra Espace 2.0 8V
1987 Renault Matra Espace J11 2.2
TELBOY
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Posts: 425



« Reply #189 on: May 08, 2020, 08:33:47 pm »

Great job on the video. You made it look so easy.
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Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #190 on: May 08, 2020, 11:07:44 pm »

Great job on the video. You made it look so easy.

I know! In a way it *is* an easy job, but since it's my first time and the powertrain is really heavy, I had a constant anxiety about things that could go wrong: The engine could tip over, the car could drop on top. I'm trying to always think ahead when working on the car to keep myself and the car safe. Working with a heavy powertrain like this requires care. But with a little diligence, Roy's good instructions and Jesper's dolly things worked out just fine Smiley
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1982 Talbot Matra Murena 2.2 prep 142
2017 BMW i3 "Charged Professional" 94Ah

Used to own:
2001 Renault Matra Grand Espace "The Race" V6 24v
1997 Renault Matra Espace 2.0 8V
1987 Renault Matra Espace J11 2.2
roy4matra
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« Reply #191 on: May 09, 2020, 08:14:31 pm »

Great job on the video. You made it look so easy.

I know! In a way it *is* an easy job, but since it's my first time and the powertrain is really heavy, I had a constant anxiety about things that could go wrong: The engine could tip over, the car could drop on top. I'm trying to always think ahead when working on the car to keep myself and the car safe. Working with a heavy powertrain like this requires care. But with a little diligence, Roy's good instructions and Jesper's dolly things worked out just fine Smiley


Well done Anders.  As you say it is fairly easy once you have experienced one, and the great thing is you don't need a crane or a hydraulic garage type lift.  It won't work for a 1.6 though as the base is not flat like the 2.2 sump, so the powertrain wants to fall over.

Next you need a Polybush kit for the stabiliser link. Smiley

Roy
« Last Edit: May 09, 2020, 08:41:14 pm by roy4matra » Logged

Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #192 on: May 10, 2020, 08:04:58 am »

Well done Anders.  As you say it is fairly easy once you have experienced one, and the great thing is you don't need a crane or a hydraulic garage type lift.  It won't work for a 1.6 though as the base is not flat like the 2.2 sump, so the powertrain wants to fall over.

Thanks Roy! In hindsight, the worst part of the job is actually the fear of something falling and getting damaged. It's a heavy machine! But it's safe Smiley

Below is a picture of the dolly Jesper has designed - here shown in the back of my Espace in which it fits like a glove Wink

The engine actually doesn't sit on the sump bottom, but on the edges of it, i.e the boltheads into the block. It's a very stable ensemble. Only problem with it is that with the engine on it bends slightly in the middle, so it's not as easy to push around as the rotating wheels might indicate.

Quote
Next you need a Polybush kit for the stabiliser link. Smiley

Of course I do! First I have a few small jobs that will keep me busy:

* clean engine and gearbox
* get the crank pulley off
* remove cam chain housing
* fit a blanked off water pump housing (Jesper is helping having one made)
* get it all screwed together
* renew valve seals

And then the engine room needs cleaning, etc, etc Smiley

Best
Anders
« Last Edit: May 10, 2020, 08:07:58 am by Anders Dinsen » Logged

1982 Talbot Matra Murena 2.2 prep 142
2017 BMW i3 "Charged Professional" 94Ah

Used to own:
2001 Renault Matra Grand Espace "The Race" V6 24v
1997 Renault Matra Espace 2.0 8V
1987 Renault Matra Espace J11 2.2
Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #193 on: May 14, 2020, 08:47:43 pm »

it's been a work-busy week, but I have moved on a little on the EWP (electrical water pump) installation as I received the booster pump and a straight connector for the main pump. Also, I've done some work on the actual installation of the pump in the front behind the radiator. Pictures will come.

Jesper is helping me make a plug to seal off a blank water pump housing (picture). The housing will require some metal working on the inside to clear away the edges as the pump impeller will be gone and the inside of the pump housing is designed to channel the water around the impeller. That should be removed or it will limit the water flow.

I'm thinking about how to make a tool out of peices of 3 mm aluminum for blocking the flywheel if I fnd I can't remove the crank shaft nut without blocking the crank. But perhaps it would be easier to just take the gearbox off. I did remove the lower bolt before taking the engine out, so will be possible even with the engine sitting on the dolly. Hmm.

Also, I will be replacing valve seals and has been looking for a good toolset to do the job with. This looks useful: https://www.ebay.de/itm/Druckluft-Ventilschaftdichtung-Ventil-Federspanner-Werkzeug-Satz-Ventilfeder-Set/202821300161

Although the actual procedure is different on the 2.2 heads from what's shown here, this video illustrates how a similar toolset is used: https://youtu.be/4xep4wfpd3k

Thinking, thinking Smiley

But it's all mostly procrastination from where I really need to turn my attention: Cleaning the engine and then the engine room. However, I've run out of spray degreaser...

/Anders
« Last Edit: May 14, 2020, 09:18:44 pm by Anders Dinsen » Logged

1982 Talbot Matra Murena 2.2 prep 142
2017 BMW i3 "Charged Professional" 94Ah

Used to own:
2001 Renault Matra Grand Espace "The Race" V6 24v
1997 Renault Matra Espace 2.0 8V
1987 Renault Matra Espace J11 2.2
TELBOY
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Posts: 425



« Reply #194 on: May 15, 2020, 08:28:56 am »

Not sure about your milage, but if I had the engine out of mine I would replace clutch components as well, and splitting the engine is something that even I could do and will prob save time in the long run
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