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Author Topic: Question about Ferodo brake pads  (Read 5175 times)
Jon Weywadt
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« on: July 15, 2012, 09:59:54 pm »

My Murena needs a new set of brake pads on the rear. The Green stuff did not last long.  Angry

Among my Murena parts I have a set of new Ferodo brake pads, but can anyone tell me if they will fit and where?
On the box it says Ferodo "328 001 EOO" and below that "120.626 UO" On the pads are stamped in red "Ferodo 675" and "13 04 81"

They look familiar, but I haven't taken off the worn pads yet, so I can't be sure. Just thought I would find out if they are right before I take things apart.  Cheesy
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Oetker
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« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2012, 02:18:35 pm »

Maybe this is something for you.
The good old stuff.

http://www.ebay.de/itm/250678092833?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

Ferodo numbers for the rear FDB-114

Th numbers you provided are for Mercedes and Volvo and the pads look very different.

« Last Edit: July 17, 2012, 02:26:27 pm by Oetker » Logged

I feel like Jonah, only my fish looks different.
Murena 2.2 Red 1982. Murena 1.6 black on places.
Jon Weywadt
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« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2012, 12:25:45 pm »


Th numbers you provided are for Mercedes and Volvo and the pads look very different.


Here are photos of the front and back of my Ferodo pads. As you can see they look very similar to the ones in the ebay link you provided. I guess I won't know for sure how different they are until I take out hte old ones. Sad
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Matranaut par excellence Cool
Oetker
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« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2012, 11:54:50 pm »

You need to weld a small piece of metal to hold the piston in place.
That is also with the pads in the auction.
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I feel like Jonah, only my fish looks different.
Murena 2.2 Red 1982. Murena 1.6 black on places.
Oetker
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« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2012, 06:05:58 am »

The number 675 found on Ferodo is the composite used on the pads wich is right.
A good composite is also important, because it will more or less influence the working of the brakes.
So stay with the good brands.
I did hear people having problems with the cheap stuff.

best regards
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I feel like Jonah, only my fish looks different.
Murena 2.2 Red 1982. Murena 1.6 black on places.
roy4matra
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« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2012, 11:54:15 am »

My Murena needs a new set of brake pads on the rear. The Green stuff did not last long.  Angry


Any brake pads that do not last long mean that the calipers are sticking.

The EBC greenstuff pads will last just as long approx. as any others.  I have had them on my Murena and they have lasted 20,000 km, so I know they are fine.

The 675 Ferodo number is simply the code for the material used.  It is the part numbers that define what shape the pads are that is important.  Front should be Ferodo FDB235 or EBC DP2317 and rear should be Ferodo FDB106 or EBC DP2189.

Roy
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roy4matra
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« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2012, 12:13:41 pm »

You need to weld a small piece of metal to hold the piston in place.
That is also with the pads in the auction.

No, you do NOT weld anything to the pads, and you should never weld anything anyway as the heat will damage the pad material and bonding.

You need to understand why that small pip is on the back of certain pads.

The piston on the rear caliper MUST be fitted with the bleed point inside the piston at the highest point, to allow the calipers to be bled properly.  Since you cannot see that bleed point, they machined a groove across the piston and then made a smaller parallel groove to one side of it.  When that groove is horizontal with the smaller groove to the top, the piston bleed point is correctly in the highest position.

The pip on the back of the pad when fitted fits in that groove, but is offset from the centre of the piston.  That means that if the groove was not horizontal, and therefore the piston was not in the right position, you could not fit the pads.  So it forces the person fitting the pads to make sure the piston groove is horizontal.  However, they could have the piston 'upside down' with the smaller groove at the bottom, so it is not 100% foolproof.

If you find some pads without the pip on the back AND they are the right pads, then you can still use them.  But you must make sure the piston is fitted correctly with the groove horizontal and the smaller groove to the top.  If you do that everything will work as it is supposed to. (assuming everything else is good!)

Some people think the pip is to stop the piston rotating in use.  That is total nonsense!!  Just think about it for a moment.  If you have ever fitted new pads or overhauled the calipers you will know how much effort is required to rotate the piston when you need to, to wind it back in to fit new pads, or when re-assembling after overhaul.  So the piston will never rotate on its own at any time.  Second, when applying the brakes, the force of the piston on the pads and the disc is sufficient to ensure no rotation could ever take place at that time owing to the friction and forces involved.  So the piston will NEVER rotate at any time either on its own or when being applied.

So the pip has no other function than to ensure the groove is horizontal and if it is not present, as long as the piston groove is horizontal, the pads and brakes will be fine.


One further thing about brake pads.  I am finding that most pads these days are coming fitted with aural reminder buttons, to warn you when the pads are getting low.  A good idea that is far more reliable than the electrical wire system.  However, I don't think the manufacturers of the pads understand what these buttons are for!

They are fitting them on the wrong side of the pads! :-)

The button is a soft material and is supposed to be fitted so that it contacts the disc and makes a lot of noise but without damaging the disc, when the linings are nearly worn out.  As there is one button on each pad, it doesn't matter which pad wears first or even if one wears rapidly as the caliper is sticking, you will get a warning before the material is all worn out.  But not if they fit them on the wrong side!

When you get the new pads, you need to punch these buttons out and fit them on the correct side, so they can do the job they were designed for.  If you punch them out with a small pin punch in the centre of the riveted side, it should retain the material so that when you push them in again from the correct side, there will be enough sticking through to re-rivet them in again.  I have done this numerous times so I know it works fine.  All was explained in our club magazine with diagrams.

Roy
« Last Edit: October 17, 2012, 12:36:45 pm by roy4matra » Logged

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