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Author Topic: Oil and oilcooler for a 2.2  (Read 3339 times)
krede
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« on: October 22, 2006, 05:05:54 pm »

Has anybody here fitted an oilcooler to a murena 2.2?
I am considering a oil to water cooler like the type fitted to the peugeot mi16 engines, but if anybody has another solution i'd be glad to hear about it.

What type of oil is the 2.2 designed to use? (viscosity etc)....and can anybody recommend any particular brand?.
 
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Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2006, 08:23:00 pm »

The question of engine oil is one which I have had a couple of fruitful discussions with Roy (MECUK Murena tech advisor and engineer and mechanic through countless years) about, and where I have been persuaded (by his arguments and by reading up on the subject) to beleive that there is only one option for any car at any age: Fully synthetic oil. The numbers are secondary, but I have chosen to spend the little extra money on a 5W/50 which keeps the viscosity better when hot than the /40.

The engine is not designed for any specific viscosity, but you should find one that's relatively thin when cold and thick when hot. 5W/50 is perfect for that all year.

The following resource is *very* useful:
http://www.carbibles.com/engineoil_bible.html

I would not care about brand.

I have just today treated my Murena with Valvoline VR1 5W/50.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2006, 08:26:24 pm by Anders Dinsen » Logged

'82 Murena 2.2 prep 142
'01 Grand Espace 24v
'08 Smart Fortwo 0,8 cdi
krede
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« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2006, 12:00:42 am »

As far as I know "Duckhams" should be some of the best oils on the market, when compairing price to quality.
I agree on the "full synthetic "bit, but Viscosity does have quite a bit to say.
If you use too "thin" an oil, you can cause serious damage to your engine.
As an example we had to use ancient mineral oil on the g3 apc's In iraq instead of the fancy new synthetic stuff the factory recommended.. simply because it got to thin in the heat.
I also suspect that the oilpump and gallys, as well as gaskets and oilseals, might have trouble it the oil is to thin.
I recon that 10w40 is the safe bet when it comes to oil grade. especially on older engines.. but ill read the link you posted... and be much wiser :-)
« Last Edit: October 23, 2006, 12:26:50 am by Lennart Sorth » Logged
Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2006, 05:57:36 am »

As an example we had to use ancient mineral oil on the g3 apc's In iraq instead of the fancy new synthetic stuff the factory recommended.. simply because it got to thin in the heat.

If the high temperature grade is too low (e.g. a 10W/30), then the oil will be quite thin when warm, and this is what you get from the /50-grade: High temperature viscosity.

But you are right: Viscosity matters since it is essentially the viscosity that gives the greasing between moving parts, even under pressure.

I think a bigger problem is what the engine has been running on before - the engine I have in my old Espace J117 has a bit of sludge built up inside. It is clearly visible when removing the rocker cover as it sits everywhere inside the head. Sludge like that can cause problems if it is released and blocks an oil channel somewhere. The synthetic oil will not produce sludge, whereas the mineral oil will always.
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'82 Murena 2.2 prep 142
'01 Grand Espace 24v
'08 Smart Fortwo 0,8 cdi
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