| Home  Blogs Help Search Login Register  
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: torque settings - Tightening original murena 2.2 alloy wheels  (Read 5846 times)
njesper
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 125



« on: July 19, 2007, 12:38:50 pm »

Dear people,

Does anybody have the torque settings for tightening the the original alloy wheels of a 2.2 with a wheel-torque wrench?

I think it's in the manual somewhere, but I can't remember, and I don't have the manual at hand right now.

Best,
Jesper
Logged
roy4matra
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 873



« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2007, 01:02:46 pm »

Does anybody have the torque settings for tightening the the original alloy wheels of a 2.2 with a wheel-torque wrench?

The manual states 6.3 daNm (but with a max. of 7.5).  I have always used 7 daNm with no problems.

Roy
Logged

njesper
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 125



« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2007, 01:40:31 pm »

Super. Thanks Roy.

Now other people can find this info on the site, if they suddenly need to know.

Best,

Jesper
Logged
macaroni
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 533


Murena and Multipla - I like it 3 abreast!


« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2007, 02:40:57 pm »

Torque settings for wheel bolts??

I just hit the wheel brace till they squeak.
Logged
roy4matra
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 873



« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2007, 08:40:35 pm »

Torque settings for wheel bolts??

I just hit the wheel brace till they squeak.

Tut, tut Antony (and well done Jesper).  That's almost as bad as people doing wheel bolts or nuts up with an impact wrench.  You would be surprised how much too tight you can do wheels even by hand and every time you do, you distort alloy wheels slightly and possibly the threads.  I have *always* torqued wheels up with a torque wrench, but then I was trained properly as a truck technician and you have to be absolutely sure that you can say with certainty at any time that if a wheel on a truck comes off, it was not because you did not do them up properly.  The same should apply to cars.  There is no way you can do truck wheels up without a torque wrench and know you have done them up correctly, and on the same principal neither can you with any other wheel.  Do you realise that the nuts on the largest truck have a torque of 600Nm and there are 10 per wheel.

You might think it is not important and you have not heard of wheels coming off a car.  Well over thirty five years in this trade I have.  What is more, we get quite a number of cars in with damaged and broken studs/bolts, and also wheels that are almost impossible to remove since they have been done up too tight repeatedly.  If a mechanic didn't torque your cylinder head you would be appalled.  What is so different with wheels?

Sorry for this rant, but I have seen this so many times, and it is an uphill struggle to stop this bad habit both inside and outside the trade.  People are quick to complain about things the professionals do, or don't do, but often they are as bad themselves.  End of lesson...

Roy
Logged

macaroni
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 533


Murena and Multipla - I like it 3 abreast!


« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2007, 09:08:00 pm »

Come on Roy, you can't compare torquing a cylinder head, which has to seal 200psi pressure with tightening a road wheel.
My Dad is a mechanic of 40 years, trained in the REME initially and then at Henlys. He taught me how to tighten wheel nuts and in all his years, has never seen a wheel fall off due to not tightening the nuts to the correct torque. Taper bearings yes, but not road wheels.

Like you, he/we disagree with over-tightening them with an impact wrench, but nicely tight with a wheel spider is surely acceptable.
Whenever I have had new tyres fitted, I always bring the car home, loosen the super-tight nuts and refit them with my wheelbrace.

If you have a puncture in the pouring rain and fit your spare, are you going get your torque wrench out at the roadside?

I agree, torquing does ensure they have reached the correct tightness, but there are other acceptable ways surely?
Logged
Lennart Sorth
Administrator
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 818



WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2007, 12:04:20 am »

You might think it is not important and you have not heard of wheels coming off a car.

heh - my very first car was a Simca 1100.
I had the garage fix a hanging rear brake, but they forgot to tighten the right rear wheel - and it came off some 20 miles later... in the middle of the night, with my wife and 3 months old son in the car ... I inspected the scrathed but undamaged drumbrake, found the wheel and two wheel nuts, and stole one of the others, so two wheels only had 3 nuts.

We were on our way to a party, and I arrived with this story that I at the time though was the first time in the history ... I lost a wheel while driving.
Turned out most other people there had either tried it, or knew somebody who had.

Its apparently more common than one should think.


For a more recent example, look at the Tom Kristensen Audi at Le Mans 2007 ....

/Lennart
Logged

Lennart.Sorth@matrasport.dk
Murena 1983 1.9i silver // Alfa Romeo Giulietta 2.0d 2012 white // Smart 4two cdi 2010 blue //
roy4matra
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 873



« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2007, 02:26:35 am »

Come on Roy, you can't compare torquing a cylinder head, which has to seal 200psi pressure with tightening a road wheel.
My Dad is a mechanic of 40 years, trained in the REME initially and then at Henlys. He taught me how to tighten wheel nuts and in all his years, has never seen a wheel fall off due to not tightening the nuts to the correct torque.

Well I'm sorry but I totally disagree, and if your father has not seen wheels fall off due to tightening problems then he hasn't that much experience it seems.  There has been an on going investigation over many years by the likes of the IRTE and other bodies and many many instances of wheels coming off traced to tightening problems.  There has been reams written about it, and you can look them up quite easily if you wish.  I have also been out a number of times myself when I used to do breakdown work, so please don't tell me that it doesn't happen often.  It is less now than it used to be, simply because of things implemented from those studies, but it still happens.

And yes I do compare it with head tightening but not for the reason you state - the point I'm making is that a wheel coming off is far more dangerous than a problem with the head gasket.  The major point about using a torque wrench is to get equal torquing as well as the actual figure.  In fact on non-stretch bolt tightening, often the actual figure was not that critical - as long as it was close, the important thing was the equality.

Quote
If you have a puncture in the pouring rain and fit your spare, are you going get your torque wrench out at the roadside?

If mine is in the car yes, but if not, I would do them as soon as I got home or to work, AND I would only travel at reduced speeds until they had been torqued, just as I would also get the spare pressure checked immediately after fitting it. I have seen so many people fit spares that they have no idea of the pressure or condition and then immediately drive at speeds of 90mph on motorways!  The importance of wheels and tyres is far too under-rated by the public I'm afraid.

Quote
I agree, torquing does ensure they have reached the correct tightness, but there are other acceptable ways surely?

Not as far as I and others are concerned.

Roy
« Last Edit: July 20, 2007, 01:59:36 pm by Lennart Sorth » Logged

macaroni
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 533


Murena and Multipla - I like it 3 abreast!


« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2007, 09:17:06 am »

OK, fair enough, I don't want this to degenerate into a slanging match.

Just that I've never experienced or heard of this happening on a road car, until now.

I understand the need for it on a commercial heavy goods vehicle and that's why they have those nut lock indicators, but on a road car weighing a tonne, it seems overly cautious, to me.

I'm out.
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to: