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Author Topic: Time to do some repairs  (Read 172 times)
Moes
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« on: November 24, 2019, 06:15:21 pm »

Hi

Almost 14 year ago I bought my Bagheera, back then it was in very bad shape, and it was my first restoration project (and on a study-budget).

I have over the year made a lot of work on the car, but I have never had the engine out, always working my way around it. The gearbox has always been bad, and it has lately been bothering me. So recently I bought another gearbox (in unknown condition), I had it opened, and the gears and synchromesh rings was clearly in better shape than on my old gearbox. I switched the gearbox and tried it out; I was very different than the old one, but unfortunately it was "singing" in 4. gear; bad bearing.
I also found out that my left rear wheel bearing was going bad, while changing gearbox..

Therefore I desided to pull the car of the road, and get all of those worn out parts changes, and do some "2.0 restoration".

My 2.0 restoration to do list is getting longer every time I look at the car:

 - New rear wheel bearings and seal kits (both sides)
 - New seals on the differential
 - Rebuild all brake calibers
 - "New" clutch (I have a spare engine with what seems to be a almost new clutch)
 - New clutch bearing
 - Make new gas tank straps (like the originals)
 - Sand down the engine bay, prime it and coat it
 - Repair bad welds at the rear half of the car (the front must wait until restoration 3.0) there is a lot of old very badly made sheet metal work/velds on the car  Cry
 - Get all the loose metal parts sand blasted and powder coated
 - Rebuild a gearbox; I have bought a set of new synchromesh-rings, and the gear from the newly bought gearbox should do the job.
 - Get the gearbox and differential cleaned, primed and coated (or cleaned and treated with a thin coat of Alodine)
 - Replace the center engine mount
 - Clean the engine block and give it a new coat
 - Change the oil pan seal
 - Clean and paint the starter motor    

I startet out the work this weekend, and got the engine out (and the garage floor cleaned after some coolant spill) :-)  

I have attached some pictures from back when I was younger, more optimistic, and the car had just been brought home  Grin

 - Frederik  
« Last Edit: November 24, 2019, 08:02:54 pm by Moes » Logged
Moes
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Posts: 139



« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2019, 06:20:01 pm »

Some pictures from this weekend  Grin

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Moes
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Posts: 139



« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2019, 06:31:49 pm »

While removing the rear suspension, I realized that something was missing  Shocked

The cast iron piece locking the torsion bars, was not "locked" at the front end, but when realizing it, I remembered that I had seen some part with rubber laying in one of my boxes with old parts. And thankfully they were the right parts  Grin
   
- Frederik
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Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2019, 09:57:57 pm »

Nice to see you're on to 2.0 - the 1.0 job you did with your car was impressive! I'm sure 2.0 will be good. She deserves the TLC she is receiving now Smiley

I like your garage - it's much larger and neater than mine Smiley I'll have to come over to see your place soon. Thanks for posting the pictures!

/Anders
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'82 Murena 2.2 prep 142
'01 Grand Espace 24v
'08 Smart Fortwo 0,8 cdi
Moes
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Posts: 139



« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2019, 01:21:00 pm »

Hi Anders

Please stop by some day  Smiley

My next step is removing the gas tank, then the engine compartment should be ready for inspection.  

If I am lucky there wonít be any welding/sheet metal work needed in the engine compartment, and i will then have to remove rust and loose paint; do I need to remove all the old paint?? It seems that a former owner have been using a bad quality paint, which is flaking off, so that might answer my question, but on the other hand, if some of the original paint is having a good bond to the chassis, then I donít suppose that I need to spend a lot of time removing it?

I am planning to coat the engine compartment with 2-3 layers of 2-component epoxy primer, which I have always had very good experience with (the closes thing to the holy grail of primers); it bonds to metal like nothing else I have tried, it's strong, durable, does not crack or flake, and the one I am using is fluid/chemical resistant  Grin

My question is, what top coat should I use?
The top-coat is going to be black, and not treated with any underbody sealants; I only drive it in sunny weather  Cheesy  

I was looking at Carbuilder.com, and they have a product called POR 15 (Paint On Rust)..  but after reading and watching some reviews online, it does not seems to be the wonder paint, which the manufacturer advertise it to be. Apparently it becomes very hard, too hard, and when used on sheet metal on cars, it starts to crack and tear of, because of movement and vibration. It might be good on old american frame chassis... But I have not tried it myself.

I have in the past used Hammerite 1-component top coat, this one is easy to use, specially the one with hammer-"effect/look" the smooth one is a bit harder to get a good looking result with. But now after some years I see the result of using Hammerite as top coat; It is not very chemical resistant, the places where oil or bearing grease have been in contact with Hammerite coated surfaces, the paint seems to go soft  Undecided And Hammerite in general does not have a very good bond to epoxy primed surfaces. And it Hammerite easily chips of if struck lightly doing any work on the car. Well, thatís is my experience.

I would like a top coat I can brush on, because it is just much easier of me to handle in my garage ( I am also applying the primer with a brush, which takes.. time).

Maybe it would be the right thing to use an 2-component acrylic auto-body coat, but I am not sure I can get a hold of that, they all seem to be water based these days, and in need of heat to harden, or am I wrong?  And I an not sure that I can use a brush with that kind of paint..  

So, does any of you have any good experiences with a specific product I can use as top-coat, any suggestions?

Best regards Frederik  
« Last Edit: November 26, 2019, 01:27:20 pm by Moes » Logged
Anders Dinsen
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« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2019, 07:39:22 am »

Hi Anders

Please stop by some day  Smiley

I will! Smiley

About your paint questions. I'm in no way an expert, but could ask my neighbor who runs a car paint shop what he would do... but I have a feeling he would recommend acrylic paint as he said that to me earlier when I asked him about topcoating the zinga I'm using on my Murena as a "primer". I'll ask him about the hardening/curing process. I would guess you would be all right by just letting it cure for longer, though.

I would spray it on from a can - for an engine room, a few imperfections are almost expected, it *is* a 70's car after all Smiley
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'82 Murena 2.2 prep 142
'01 Grand Espace 24v
'08 Smart Fortwo 0,8 cdi
Moes
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 139



« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2019, 09:51:41 am »

Hi Anders

Thank you, please ask you neighbor about the curing process when you run into him Grin  

I don't have high expectation to the finish of the surface in the engine compartment, I really just want it to be black, and not sticky  Cool

Yesterday I removed the rear wheel bearings from the trailing arms. I heated the area around the bearings with a small blow torch, not that much actually, probably just up to 70-80 degrees celsius. And then they where fairly easy to push out.

I have also received new parts from France:

 - New rear wheel bearings with inner and outer seals  
 - Seals for the differential
 - Other gaskets
 - Hub nuts
 - Center engine mount
 - Brake caliber repair kits (alle four)
 - New drivers side armrest
 
Today I am going to the DIY handyman shop Biltema, to buy all of there cleaning/sanding discs and brushes  Cheesy

While removing some loose paint, I saw a little black spot on the "main rear bridge" (which is being used as a vacuum tank), the spot seems to be a tiny rust hole, I have marked with red on the picture, but it is hard to see. But this explains why it does not keep its vacuum for very long after shutting the engine off.

I also found several tears in the metal sheets making the engine compartment air ducts under the boot, they don't seem that rusty, so I am guessing its because of vibrations  Huh  

Best regards Frederik
« Last Edit: November 30, 2019, 10:16:05 am by Moes » Logged
Moes
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Posts: 139



« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2019, 10:30:23 am »

I have also been removing the gas tank, and taking some "before" pictures

I also found a nasty scratch in the gas-tank towards the engine  Cry   I am not sure what to about that. The rest of the tank is in incredible good condition after 45 year, it does not feel brittle, they really did know how to make gas-tanks out af good plastic!  

At some point someone in the past had a hard time fitting the trailing arms, and then they choose to drill some new bolt holes, for then to realize that the new hole was not the way to go..  after that they spot welded some washers onto the original holes, so that the new holes were blocked  Cry  = more work for me..

I have also been thinking about the weird welding repair on the air duct which is not that rusty in other places.The position of the repair is at the exhaust manifold, so I am guessing that the heat from the manifold have destroyed the paint on the air duct and it rusted.. As you can see the repair has also rusted.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2019, 01:46:00 pm by Moes » Logged
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