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 1 
 on: April 23, 2019, 09:32:18 pm 
Started by Anders Dinsen - Last post by Anders Dinsen
So, I've learnt something new today, namely that pneumatic seals are lip seals. The old seal had completely lost its lip! The shaft is 10 mm, the outer diameter of the old seal is 18, and the height appears to be 4 mm.

 2 
 on: April 22, 2019, 07:35:19 pm 
Started by Anders Dinsen - Last post by Anders Dinsen
The vacuum actuator turned out to be fixable. I opened it using a pair of pliers. Once opened I could remove the tube in which the shaft should slide. It required a good amount to force to pull it out, but I got it out without visible damage to the shaft.

The problem seems to be the blue O-ring seal, which fits inside the tube and has broken. A part of it has probably found its way down by the shaft and caused it to stick.

It's not a standard round O-ring, but rectangular and slightly conical in cross section, not unlike the seals that fit around brake pistons, so I'll have to do some research to find it. Some kind of grease also need to be applied to the shaft before assembly, and the halves must be cleaned and painted, of course.

 3 
 on: April 22, 2019, 06:42:57 am 
Started by Anders Dinsen - Last post by Anders Dinsen
Hi there. I had the same problem with my rear bumper brackets! I ground them as flush as I could get them bent the cage where it is not welded and removed them. Then fitted new nuts bent them back into shape and added a spot of weld. That way the bolts could still move along the channel for adjustment. Took about half an hour. 

That's the better solution! The cages are now gone on mine, so a little helper will be needed when we get to refitting the bumper.

 4 
 on: April 22, 2019, 06:41:18 am 
Started by TELBOY - Last post by Anders Dinsen
Just got to figure out where this lot go!
Starting on the interior now.............The red "T" handle is the cable I have fitted for the emergency light lift

Great! Looking good in a messy way Wink

My cable for the emergency light lift broke as I tried to undo it by the lifter bar... I will refit it for originality, but I've never heard of anyone having to use it, and with the angle on which it pulls, I think it's barely useful.

 5 
 on: April 21, 2019, 08:53:55 pm 
Started by Anders Dinsen - Last post by TELBOY
Hi there. I had the same problem with my rear bumper brackets! I ground them as flush as I could get them bent the cage where it is not welded and removed them. Then fitted new nuts bent them back into shape and added a spot of weld. That way the bolts could still move along the channel for adjustment. Took about half an hour. 

 6 
 on: April 21, 2019, 08:31:02 pm 
Started by TELBOY - Last post by TELBOY
Just got to figure out where this lot go!
Starting on the interior now.............The red "T" handle is the cable I have fitted for the emergency light lift

 7 
 on: April 20, 2019, 01:00:06 pm 
Started by Anders Dinsen - Last post by Anders Dinsen
Deciding what to work on and sticking to that is important in order to keep a systematic approach to the work when it's done in spare time, but I changed my mind about working on the rear and has turned the car around in the garage to get started on the front.

There are multiple reasons for that: My garage barely allows me to work around the car, so the end that I'm active on needs to be by the door. Second, finishing something is always good, it doesn't help working on everything at the same time, and the front can be finished now. Third, there are so many rivets, wires, screws, rusty metal parts that actually finishing the front will involve a decent amount of work which will be good to have in status "done" once I take the engine out. Fourth, I can't get the rear done until I remove the exhaust, which I don't want to do until I'm ready to take the engine out.

So below are pictures of her current state. Next up is removing the battery well, shocks, wheels, steering rack and a few other parts to get access to the chassis so that it can be carefully cleaned and zinc sprayed in salty and corroded areas. It looks quite good, though.

I may need a new radiator, by the way.

BTW, the problem with the headlight mechanism was that the vacuum actuator has seized in the shaft. I don't think I can repair it so will need a new one. If someone has one lying around, I'll be willing to pay a good price Smiley

 8 
 on: April 17, 2019, 09:28:07 am 
Started by matra530 - Last post by matra530
Hello Roy,

when you say, that 8,9 mm is original, than will I check it on my engine in my car. Possible, that the training head ist not original.

 9 
 on: April 16, 2019, 04:16:58 am 
Started by Anders Dinsen - Last post by Anders Dinsen
However, this is all academic now as you don't have the PCBs.  The low output I would have said was low battery and then with new batteries you would have just needed to re-synchronise them, to get it working again.  That was probably why they didn't initially work after new batteries were inserted.

I have an M. Sc. (EE) and it wasn't the batteries, the electronics failed for some reason. And yes, as I don't have the PCB's, even an academic degree doesn't help Smiley

/Anders

 10 
 on: April 15, 2019, 09:36:14 am 
Started by Anders Dinsen - Last post by JV
Thanks!

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